Posts tagged important

One of the ways you control what people think is by creating the illusion that there’s a debate going on, but making sure that the debate stays within very narrow margins.

Noam Chomsky

: rockinajar  :.

(via resmc)

Racism is not in your intent. Your intent is immaterial in how racist your actions are. This isn’t about you BEING a racist. It’s about you DOING A THING that is racist. Your intent doesn’t change it. Your ignorance of its meaning doesn’t change it. It’s got nothing to do with you as a person and everything to do with the meaning of your action in the context of sociocultural history.

- moniquill (on red face & cultural appropriation)

I’m just going to reblog this again, since some people apparently need reminding. 

(via darkjez)

sociolab:

itsasmallsmallworld:

“There are two schools of thought: that knowledge is power and that ignorance is bliss. If you think the former, then sociology will serve you well. If you think the latter you might want to discontinue the journey. It is better that you do not proceed past this point…

…There are comforts in delusions, in thinking that the world is at it should be. It is so much easier to believe that the unemployed are out of work because they are lazy, that the homeless live outside because they prefer fresh air, that prisons are full of bad people because there are no bad circumstances. It is much more troubling to think that the system itself is at fault, that structural inequalities are embedded within it, that some people do so well only because others do so very badly…

…To have illusions punctured can be unsettling and sociology does this. Our ‘first wisdom’ is that things are not necessarily as they appear. It exposes connections and relationships; it renders visible the links between past and present, rich and poor. Sociology illuminates what the privileged and powerful prefer to hide, but it may also show us things that will challenge our ontological security. So, before we proceed any further, some words of caution: Warning: Sociology will corrupt your taken-for-granted world. You will never take anything at face value again. 

If you lack inquisitiveness, avoid shock and never seek to be challenged, if you really take no pleasure in discovery and have no desire to see the world afresh; if you want to believe things can only be how your teacher or preacher said they are; if you never say ‘I doubt it’, sociology is best avoided.”

This is a little piece from the Introduction chapter of my Sociology book.

I think I’ve finally found the subject I want to major in :)

Bolded the parts that I love.  I don’t think I’ve ever read a better description of sociology.

People don’t get heard as much as they’d like. It was a great realization for me as a writer that people really want to be listened to. They are surprised that someone is interested, really interested. And you have to really want to hear somebody. A big part of it is tapping people’s natural desire to be listened to, especially since they know they’ll never have to deal with you again. It’s the same principle that underlies therapy, confession, conversations with strangers on airplanes: it’s a kind of duty-free intimacy that people really crave. If you can provide it without tricking people — because it’s not duty-free; it gets published — you can tap into that incredible appetite. It’s more appealing to talk with someone you’ll never know. It’s almost like talking out loud to yourself. And there is no limit to how unnoticed people feel by the media. It’s just the nature of what is considered newsworthy. If a person is living a life that is not newsworthy, it’s appealing to have someone say, “I want to hear your story.” Most people say, “Really, really? You really want to hear?” And people have amazing stories.
theravendesk:




I hope I made myself clear ;)

Why does this always happen? Why can’t we talk about our racial issues without at least one white person coming in to talk over us? I can’t even get angry any more. I don’t even feel hurt, just completely dumbfounded.

Wait,what? Why should someone get angry because someone else says that he/she shares the same problem? Beauty Ideals drive people crazy no matter what colour is your skin. Besides, we are ALL ONE FOLK, we are ALL PEOPLE. There’s not white people, no people of colour…there’s just PEOPLE with different looks. That’s what equality is about. And I mean it, I’m not using stereotypes just to look cool.
You know? I’m starting getting a bit irritated by all this ranting about a consideration. I shouldn’t have written it ok…I apologized ok…Now stop making me feel as if I was an Afrikaneer who just stands for Apartheid .-.

So, I just wanted to take a moment to explain why people are getting upset that you entered this conversation. This is not me yelling or being angry; this is me actually trying to explain why people of color get angry when white people enter conversations that are explicitly and exclusively about them and try to tell them that their problems are not that bad.
Being a white girl and suffering self esteem issues is not the same as being a girl of color of suffering self esteem issues. Being a girl of color means you are automatically not beautiful. This is what we’re told. Being ‘dark’ is being evil. It’s being the evil witch, or the dark monster, or Caliban. It’s being sinister. This is the way our language is scripted. Evil is described as black and dark. Fairy tales describe their heroes as fair and pale and therefore beautiful and deserving of a happy ending. Villains are often described as being ‘of dark countenance’ and therefore naturally inclined toward villainy.
When we are told we’re beautiful it is in spite of the color of our skin. 
When we’re told we’re pretty it is in spite of the texture of our hair.
Our beauty and worth to society is not told within the context of what we look like but what white people look like. Their beauty is the beauty to which we should aspire. It’s why skin lightening creams do so well in other countries, why mothers tell their daughters not to tan, why aunties lament the amount of time we spend in the sun. It’s why some of my friends make comments like, I’m so dark now! I’m so hideous what do I do?!
These are things you are not going to be able to understand. Because underlying all of that is racism. Our color is not only tied to our inability to be beautiful, but to our laziness, our ineducation, our anger, our stupidity, the crime rates in urban areas, the way we choose to dress, whether we’re raped, how crimes against us are prosecuted, how we’re cast on television, if our stories our told, through which lens they’re told, how we’re sexualized, which schools we get into to, how us raising our voices (or writing caps) is perceived.
I’m a university graduate. I have a bachelors degree from the George Washington University, and people are surprised, first when I articulate intelligent thought, and second when I tell them that no, I am not working here because no one else will have me, and yes, I am a graduate student, and yes, it is an excellent school.
And it’s because of the color of my skin.
No one is surprised that my coworkers are college graduates.
So our desire for equal, quality representation and our discussion of that is so that our daughters’ and our sons’ self worth is not tied up in all of that. It’s so that people stop conceptualizing us as the victim, the beggar, the criminal, the terrorist, the Villain.
And this confession is not about self esteem. It’s an expression of a life time of being told that you are not good enough by virtue of a quality that you cannot change, that has no logical sense behind it finally finding relief. It’s someone saying I can’t be Snow White but I can be Guinevere.
And when you enter that conversation and you tell them that desire is not important its hurtful, but its also not new. And every single person that reblogged this post and said YES, AWESOME, I AGREE has heard what you just said to them: that their fears, and their hurts, and their voices are not more important than yours, that their experiences are not as painful as they think, that the world is not how they think it is, and if they would just get over it they would see that a little confidence will go a long way. And they came here, to this confession, to tumblr, to find a safe space to express years of hurt and what you did was intrude on that discussion, make it about you, and then dismiss them when they told you that you were not welcome in that discussion.
I really do respect that you had self esteem issues as a kid, but that is not the same as what the anonymous confessor endured, or as the people that reblogged it to affirm their own years of hurt. Because you have other role models to turn to, you have other people to aspire to be, and in the end, maybe all you needed was a little confidence. But that isn’t true for a lot of us, and respecting that goes a really long way.

theravendesk:

I hope I made myself clear ;)

Why does this always happen? Why can’t we talk about our racial issues without at least one white person coming in to talk over us? I can’t even get angry any more. I don’t even feel hurt, just completely dumbfounded.

Wait,what? Why should someone get angry because someone else says that he/she shares the same problem? Beauty Ideals drive people crazy no matter what colour is your skin. Besides, we are ALL ONE FOLK, we are ALL PEOPLE. There’s not white people, no people of colour…there’s just PEOPLE with different looks. That’s what equality is about. And I mean it, I’m not using stereotypes just to look cool.

You know? I’m starting getting a bit irritated by all this ranting about a consideration. I shouldn’t have written it ok…I apologized ok…Now stop making me feel as if I was an Afrikaneer who just stands for Apartheid .-.

So, I just wanted to take a moment to explain why people are getting upset that you entered this conversation. This is not me yelling or being angry; this is me actually trying to explain why people of color get angry when white people enter conversations that are explicitly and exclusively about them and try to tell them that their problems are not that bad.

Being a white girl and suffering self esteem issues is not the same as being a girl of color of suffering self esteem issues. Being a girl of color means you are automatically not beautiful. This is what we’re told. Being ‘dark’ is being evil. It’s being the evil witch, or the dark monster, or Caliban. It’s being sinister. This is the way our language is scripted. Evil is described as black and dark. Fairy tales describe their heroes as fair and pale and therefore beautiful and deserving of a happy ending. Villains are often described as being ‘of dark countenance’ and therefore naturally inclined toward villainy.

When we are told we’re beautiful it is in spite of the color of our skin.

When we’re told we’re pretty it is in spite of the texture of our hair.

Our beauty and worth to society is not told within the context of what we look like but what white people look like. Their beauty is the beauty to which we should aspire. It’s why skin lightening creams do so well in other countries, why mothers tell their daughters not to tan, why aunties lament the amount of time we spend in the sun. It’s why some of my friends make comments like, I’m so dark now! I’m so hideous what do I do?!

These are things you are not going to be able to understand. Because underlying all of that is racism. Our color is not only tied to our inability to be beautiful, but to our laziness, our ineducation, our anger, our stupidity, the crime rates in urban areas, the way we choose to dress, whether we’re raped, how crimes against us are prosecuted, how we’re cast on television, if our stories our told, through which lens they’re told, how we’re sexualized, which schools we get into to, how us raising our voices (or writing caps) is perceived.

I’m a university graduate. I have a bachelors degree from the George Washington University, and people are surprised, first when I articulate intelligent thought, and second when I tell them that no, I am not working here because no one else will have me, and yes, I am a graduate student, and yes, it is an excellent school.

And it’s because of the color of my skin.

No one is surprised that my coworkers are college graduates.

So our desire for equal, quality representation and our discussion of that is so that our daughters’ and our sons’ self worth is not tied up in all of that. It’s so that people stop conceptualizing us as the victim, the beggar, the criminal, the terrorist, the Villain.

And this confession is not about self esteem. It’s an expression of a life time of being told that you are not good enough by virtue of a quality that you cannot change, that has no logical sense behind it finally finding relief. It’s someone saying I can’t be Snow White but I can be Guinevere.

And when you enter that conversation and you tell them that desire is not important its hurtful, but its also not new. And every single person that reblogged this post and said YES, AWESOME, I AGREE has heard what you just said to them: that their fears, and their hurts, and their voices are not more important than yours, that their experiences are not as painful as they think, that the world is not how they think it is, and if they would just get over it they would see that a little confidence will go a long way. And they came here, to this confession, to tumblr, to find a safe space to express years of hurt and what you did was intrude on that discussion, make it about you, and then dismiss them when they told you that you were not welcome in that discussion.

I really do respect that you had self esteem issues as a kid, but that is not the same as what the anonymous confessor endured, or as the people that reblogged it to affirm their own years of hurt. Because you have other role models to turn to, you have other people to aspire to be, and in the end, maybe all you needed was a little confidence. But that isn’t true for a lot of us, and respecting that goes a really long way.

beginningthebeguine:

youaintpunk:

The riots also offered a glimpse into how photographs can be used out of context:
‘Sir: In last week’s article about the poll-tax riot in Trafalgar Square (‘THE MOB’S BRIEF RULE’, 7 April) there is a large photograph labelled ‘A West End shopper argues with a protester’. The woman in the photograph is me, and I thought you might like to know the true story behind the picture.
I was on my way to the theatre, with my husband. As we walked down Regent Street at about 6.30pm, the windows were intact and there was a large, cheerful, noisy group of poll-tax protesters walking up from Piccadilly Circus. We saw ordinary uniformed police walking alongside, on the pavement, keeping a low profile. The atmosphere was changed dramatically in moments when a fast-walking, threatening group of riot-squad police appeared.
We walked on to the top of Haymarket, where the atmosphere was more tense and more protesters were streaming up Haymarket from the Trafalgar Square end. Suddenly a group of mounted police charged at full gallop into the rear of the group of protesters, scattering them, passers-by and us and creating panic. People screamed and some fell. Next to me and my husband another group of riot-squad appeared, in a most intimidating manner.
The next thing that happened is what horrified me most. Four of the riot-squad police grabbed a young girl of 18 or 19 for no reason and forced her in a brutal manner on to the crowd-control railings, with her throat across the top of the railings. Her young male companion was frantically trying to reach her and was being held back by one riot-squad policeman. In your photograph I was urging the boy to calm down or he might be arrested; he was telling me that the person being held down across the railings was his girlfriend.
My husband remonstrated with the riot-squad policeman holding the boy, and I shouted at the four riot-squad men to let the girl go as they were obviously hurting her. To my surprise, they did let her go – it was almost as if they did not know what they were doing.
The riot-squad policemen involved in this incident were not wearing any form of identification. Their epaulettes were unbuttoned and flapping loose; I lifted them on two men and neither had any numbers on. There was a sergeant with them, who was numbered and my husband asked why his men wore no identifying numbers. The sergeant replied that it did not matter as he knew who the men were. We are a middle-aged suburban couple who now feel more intimidated by the Metropolitan police than by a mob. If we feel so angry, how on earth did the young hot-heads at the rally feel?’
Mrs R.A. Sare, Northwood, Middlessex Source

BOOM.

beginningthebeguine:

youaintpunk:

The riots also offered a glimpse into how photographs can be used out of context:

‘Sir: In last week’s article about the poll-tax riot in Trafalgar Square (‘THE MOB’S BRIEF RULE’, 7 April) there is a large photograph labelled ‘A West End shopper argues with a protester’. The woman in the photograph is me, and I thought you might like to know the true story behind the picture.

I was on my way to the theatre, with my husband. As we walked down Regent Street at about 6.30pm, the windows were intact and there was a large, cheerful, noisy group of poll-tax protesters walking up from Piccadilly Circus. We saw ordinary uniformed police walking alongside, on the pavement, keeping a low profile. The atmosphere was changed dramatically in moments when a fast-walking, threatening group of riot-squad police appeared.

We walked on to the top of Haymarket, where the atmosphere was more tense and more protesters were streaming up Haymarket from the Trafalgar Square end. Suddenly a group of mounted police charged at full gallop into the rear of the group of protesters, scattering them, passers-by and us and creating panic. People screamed and some fell. Next to me and my husband another group of riot-squad appeared, in a most intimidating manner.

The next thing that happened is what horrified me most. Four of the riot-squad police grabbed a young girl of 18 or 19 for no reason and forced her in a brutal manner on to the crowd-control railings, with her throat across the top of the railings. Her young male companion was frantically trying to reach her and was being held back by one riot-squad policeman. In your photograph I was urging the boy to calm down or he might be arrested; he was telling me that the person being held down across the railings was his girlfriend.

My husband remonstrated with the riot-squad policeman holding the boy, and I shouted at the four riot-squad men to let the girl go as they were obviously hurting her. To my surprise, they did let her go – it was almost as if they did not know what they were doing.

The riot-squad policemen involved in this incident were not wearing any form of identification. Their epaulettes were unbuttoned and flapping loose; I lifted them on two men and neither had any numbers on. There was a sergeant with them, who was numbered and my husband asked why his men wore no identifying numbers. The sergeant replied that it did not matter as he knew who the men were. We are a middle-aged suburban couple who now feel more intimidated by the Metropolitan police than by a mob. If we feel so angry, how on earth did the young hot-heads at the rally feel?’

Mrs R.A. Sare, Northwood, Middlessex Source

BOOM.

bookishboi:

whatfreshhellisthis:

inflateablefilth:

maddie-sakamoto:

beckysanspants:

[image: aerial photographs of the olympic stadium in East London, with a vast site of metal cabins across the motorway].

esmeweatherwax:flapjackstate:revolyeah:choongcommunist:

Cleaners at the Olympic Park are being housed ten to a room at a huge temporary compound.

The campsite in East London, hidden from public view, has 25 people sharing each toilet and 75 to each shower.

They sleep in portable cabins, some of which have been leaking in the rain.

On arrival, some were horrified to be told there was no work for two weeks. But despite this, they were made to pay the cleaning company £18 a day in ‘rent’ to sleep in the overcrowded metal cabins, which works out at more than £550 a month.

Others who had come to the UK desperate for the jobs turned back, describing  the camp as ‘horrible’, with showers and toilets ‘filthy’ from over-use.

Id say I’m surprised but I’m not….Disgusting. Fuck the Olympics.

Fuck the Olympics indeed.

We’re trying our best to outdo China.

Yeah, when Brits got all angry about the Olympics and the World Cup going Scary Brown People Places™ because of human rights issues, I wonder how many of them were willing to acknowledge that the UK isn’t exactly pristine on these things either. We made unemployed people sleep under a bridge for the Jubilee, and our Olympics seem to be going the same way.

UGH

Show of hands: Who’s surprised?

Nobody?

Oh. didn’t think so.

MOST ELEGANT DINNER PARTY: Strong People Don't Have Needs & Other Myths That Can Kill You

karnythia:

I’ve been tweeting all morning about #rapeculture & #abuseculture, and someone asked me what I meant when I referred to Strong People Myths. I think some/most of us are familiar with the Strong Black Woman Trope right? Right. For those that are unfamiliar with it, it can best be…

Before we can “do something” for the poor, there are some things we need to stop doing to them.

Most people who complain about “why do we all need labels!? Can’t we just be PEOPLE?!”…

kiriamaya:

telegantmess:

menfenced:

christinathena:

ad-mirandam:

telegantmess:

have likely never felt the flood of relief that there is a WORD FOR WHAT YOU ARE after spending years wondering if you were broken, what was wrong with you, feeling ridiculously isolated and having other people complain about things you can’t change about yourself. If there’s a word for it, that makes it a real thing.

Knowing that I am real, that I am not alone, has done so much more for me than this idea that homogenizing everyone by refusing to recognize our differences is supposed to. I felt invisible and/or mocked for most of my life by people who thought we should all just be “people.” Why in the world would anyone think that could be a good thing for me now?

“Why does everyone need a label, GAWD!?” is code for “I haven’t given myself and who I am much thought, and the fact that you have, and have had to, upsets me. So stop it and be more like me, dammit!”

this to the point of tears

And knowing how other people handle similar issues to yours helps immensely.

All this, especially that last post. People argue that all labels do is divide us, but sometimes division can be really helpful. If I can put people into little groups by different experiences they’ve gone through, it makes it easier to find people who have gone through some of the things I have and talk to them about something they understand on the same level that I do. That keeps me from feeling isolated and does more to integrate me into the people around me and society as a whole than just pretending that the differences between me and other people have absolutely no effect on my life. 

Furthermore, when people use the, “why do we need labels? We’re all just people.” argument, they’re creating a false dichotomy that does us no favors. It promotes this idea that we can’t have both division and unity. Yes, we are all people, but we are all different people as well. Acknowledging that fact doesn’t have to mean that we are people of different value or worth. It just means we’re different, and we’re talking about those differences in a clear and organized manner. Just because I label myself doesn’t mean I can’t feel a sense of fellowship, empathy, and love towards people who don’t fit under those labels. And if that’s something others can’t do, ignoring the labels isn’t going to help. 

Now, I’m not saying everybody does have to label themselves. There are some people who ARE different, who have felt broken or isolated, and have come to the conclusion that labels are just not for them, and that’s perfectly fine. There are plenty of valid reasons not to want to label yourself. But just because that works for some people doesn’t mean it works for everyone. 

yes, particularly to the bolded

Reblogging for added commentary!

But whenever we find ourselves describing someone’s ability in terms of societal measures of success—prizes, wealth, fancy titles—rather than in terms of what they are capable of doing, we ought to worry that we are deceiving ourselves. Put another way, the cynic’s question, if you’re so smart, why aren’t you rich? is misguided not only for the obvious reason that at least some smart people care about rewards other than material wealth, but also because talent is talent, and success is success, and the latter does not always reflect the former.
Everything Is Obvious:  Once You Know the Answer by Duncan J. Watts (via sociolab)

cosascool:

The World of 100 by Toby Ng

Part 1

strongaly:

African American Doctor Depicted as Gorilla at UCLA Event

“Imagine being graphically depicted as a gorilla in a slideshow photo. That alone is offensive. But the fact that the slide was publicly presented for laughs during an annual medical school sponsored event attended by more than 200 physicians, faculty, residents and guests is both shocking and indefensible.

Not only was Dr. Christian Head’s face superimposed onto the body of a gorilla standing on all-fours, but the photo also depicted him being sodomized by his Caucasian supervisor. This, unfortunately, was just one of a series of racially motivated incidents that Dr. Head has had to deal with over the past several years at UCLA. His complaints to administrative leaders at the Medical Center, the University and UC Regents have gone unanswered. In fact, his complaints have spurred additional acts of humiliation, attempts to push him out of academic medicine and retaliation.”

-Change.org

http://youtu.be/9eMwYtycb_I

ndelphinus:

::facepalm at the world:: Hey, hey everyone.  Guess what?  Just because someone has the means to fight back does not mean taunting and harassing them isn’t bullying.  I have had training in multiple forms of martial arts since I was six years old.  I was put in Young Marines the day I turned eight.  My father was very careful to make sure that all of his children could hold their own in a fight.  I am more than capable of defending myself.  That doesn’t mean someone shoving me into a wall would be justified in their actions.

Yeah, I could probably take them.  I could fight back.  I could act like an idiot who thinks antagonising the bullies is a good idea.  That doesn’t matter.  They still should have never done it to begin with.  “Pick on someone your own size” is an outdated concept that should have been completely done away with by now.

#stupid james potter fans #snape knowing sectumsempra is not a reason for the marauders to lure him to a werewolf #or hang him up by his feet and threaten to show off his balls to everyone around #it just makes the entire thing even worse because it implies they knew he wouldn’t fight back

Free speech as a legal concept only guarantees you the right to speak. It doesn’t guarantee you the right to be heard, it doesn’t guarantee you the right to be agreed with, it certainly doesn’t guarantee you the right for your speech to not be challenged by someone else’s speech, and most importantly of all, it doesn’t mean you can’t suffer consequences if and when your free speech is used to cause harm to someone. Which is exactly what sexual harassment, racial slurs, and verbal bigotry are. That’s not censorship. That’s fairness.